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05 March 2016 @ 06:45 am
His Father's Son (X-Men; Cable, Scott/Jean; PG/K+; #147: Cool Dad)  
Title: His Father's Son
Author: Kat Lee
Fandom: X-Men
Character/Pairing: Cable, Scott/Jean
Rating: PG/K+
Challenge/Prompt: comicdrabbles #147: Cool Dad
Warning(s): Character Death
Word Count: 381
Date Written: 5 March, 2016
Summary:
Disclaimer: All characters within belong to Marvel Comics and Disney, not the author, and are used without permission.



He stands alone before the grave, looking at the name of a man he barely knew. They always said they'd take the next opportunity life gave them, but it was always life that was in their way. There was always another life that needed saving or another global catastrophe that had to be stopped. There was always some mission that stood in the way of what should have been their priority.

And now his chance to take that mission is gone. His chance to get to know his father as a man has been taken from him. Jean always warned them this would happen, but neither he nor Scott would listen. Summers were stubborn that way, she'd always say with a laugh.

They're both gone from him now. He remembers Jean's laugh and her caring, green eyes. He remembers how much she cared for the both of them, and he wasn't even her son. He actually remembers less about his father. Somehow, he always knew less about Scott than Jean, and yet Scott was his father. Jean loved him, because she loved Scott.

She'd followed her husband all the way into the future from whence Cable just so she could help him raise a child that wasn't hers. She had been a kind, loving father, but clearly, his father had been a great man, too, and not just because of his heroic deeds as an X-Man. He'd cared for Cable, in his own way, greater than most fathers ever cared for their children.

He didn't know much about him. He didn't get to spend much time with him, except when he was growing up during the war, a war his father had chosen to be a part of in order to protect him and for no other reason. He never got to tell him he was a cool dad -- he didn't know the terminology back then --, but he knows, even as little as he did know the man, he was.

He gazes for at his father's headstone for a long moment before finally speaking a single word. "Thanks," he says, hefts his large gun, and moves on to fight today's war. His father was a cool dad, but he was also a warrior, and he is his father's son.

The End